Friday, March 13, 2020

Free Essays on Manhattan Projects

The Manhattan Project The Manhattan Project was the code name of the U.S.’s attempt to construct an atomic bomb during World War II. It was named after the Manhattan Engineer District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, because a lot of it’s earlier research was done in New York City. An atomic bomb is a weapon that uses the energy from a nuclear reaction called Fission for its destruction. The idea that mass could be changed into energy was predicted by Albert Einstein in the earlier part of the 1900’s. John D. Cockcroft and Ernest Walton confirmed this by experiments in 1932. Then in 1938, nuclear fission was discovered by German scientists, and it was feared by many of the U.S. scientists, that Hitler would try to build a fission bomb. Three Hungarian-born physicists, Leo Szilard, Eugene Wigner, and Edward Teller asked Albert Einstein to send a letter to Franklin Roosevelt. Compelled by the letter in late 1939, Roosevelt ordered an effort to obtain an atomic weapon before Germany. At first, this program was led by Vannevar Bush, head of the National Defense Research committee and the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Then it came under control of Leslie Groves of the Army Corps of Engineers. Groves quickly bought a site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a place for processing the Uranium-235 from the more common Uranium-238. Uranium-235 is used because it is fissionable, it releases many neutrons, and does not capture many. However, 99.3% of uranium in nature is the U-238 isotope, and only .7% is the lighter, more â€Å"fissionable† isotope U-235. Next, he gathered and combined research from many East Coast universities under direction of Arthur Compton, at the University of Chicago. He appointed theoretical physicist, J. Robert Oppenheimer as the director of the weapons laboratory, which was built on an isolated mesa located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. After much work, a ... Free Essays on Manhattan Projects Free Essays on Manhattan Projects The Manhattan Project The Manhattan Project was the code name of the U.S.’s attempt to construct an atomic bomb during World War II. It was named after the Manhattan Engineer District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, because a lot of it’s earlier research was done in New York City. An atomic bomb is a weapon that uses the energy from a nuclear reaction called Fission for its destruction. The idea that mass could be changed into energy was predicted by Albert Einstein in the earlier part of the 1900’s. John D. Cockcroft and Ernest Walton confirmed this by experiments in 1932. Then in 1938, nuclear fission was discovered by German scientists, and it was feared by many of the U.S. scientists, that Hitler would try to build a fission bomb. Three Hungarian-born physicists, Leo Szilard, Eugene Wigner, and Edward Teller asked Albert Einstein to send a letter to Franklin Roosevelt. Compelled by the letter in late 1939, Roosevelt ordered an effort to obtain an atomic weapon before Germany. At first, this program was led by Vannevar Bush, head of the National Defense Research committee and the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Then it came under control of Leslie Groves of the Army Corps of Engineers. Groves quickly bought a site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a place for processing the Uranium-235 from the more common Uranium-238. Uranium-235 is used because it is fissionable, it releases many neutrons, and does not capture many. However, 99.3% of uranium in nature is the U-238 isotope, and only .7% is the lighter, more â€Å"fissionable† isotope U-235. Next, he gathered and combined research from many East Coast universities under direction of Arthur Compton, at the University of Chicago. He appointed theoretical physicist, J. Robert Oppenheimer as the director of the weapons laboratory, which was built on an isolated mesa located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. After much work, a ...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Existential Vacuum can be Overcome by Finding Meaning of Life Research Paper

Existential Vacuum can be Overcome by Finding Meaning of Life - Research Paper Example Frankl stresses on the importance of meaning of life repeatedly in his book â€Å"Man’s Search for Meaning† and how attaching a real meaning to life can save one from the clutches of existential vacuum and escape the path to nihilism forms the main bulk of this essay. Existential vacuum is basically a disturbed psychological condition that results when one deliberately negates the meaning of one’s own life, loses interest in life and willingly enough gives up all the radiant aspirations to build up a better future. Defiant rejection of meaning of life, which plays a major role in stimulating the development of existential vacuum. ... The state of a person suffering from existential vacuum can be related to the state of a person who is imprisoned in a closed cell for numberless days and is unable to think or function properly, let alone build constructive plans for the future. Existential vacuum cuts down all the thinking abilities of a person and leaves him/her to be utterly incapable of attaching a meaning to his/her life and trust his/her own instincts rather than copying other people or doing what others demand of him/her. In the present industrialized world, people have engrossed themselves in maintaining their high life standards to such level that concepts like individualism, meaning of life, sacrificing for others, embracing sufferings, and high moral standards have become more of old-fashioned despised fantasies than anything. This fake pattern adopted by people which results in negative take at things and development of existential vacuum, actually induces Frankl to lay phenomenal stress on searching for the meaning of life so that one can follow a right path that can help in achieving feats that are entirely unachievable when the meaning of life is deliberately stifled by oneself in futile pursuit of a self-centered life and worthless pleasures. Industrialization and loss of traditional values are identified by (Cox and Klinger) to be the most common causes of existential vacuum. According to Frankl, as the concept of individualism became significantly reduced, people became less reliant on social traditions and their own instincts which reinforced their behaviors, due to which they rarely know what to do themselves. This leads to a state of loss of confidence, paranoia, loss of

Sunday, February 9, 2020

Inside Job (2010) Movie Review Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Inside Job (2010) - Movie Review Example The various traits that are in the film follow the story line that occurred from 2007 with the economic changes and associates this with the main ideologies of the economy and the government. The plot of the film is based on the financial meltdown that is a part of the current global crisis. The plot first looks at the financial crisis of 2008 and the outcomes which it caused, such as the loss of $20 trillion, loss of jobs, loss of homes and the eventual global collapse that was associated with this. The plot then moves into interviews and associations with the financial crisis to define what happened and occurred and how it became a major component of history. The attributes are incorporative of defining an industry that was always corrupt and rogue and which forced the financial meltdown. The main ideology that is given from the director is that the industry corruption led to a forced meltdown which could have been prevented otherwise. The setting is based on the interviews of thos e in the financial industry and is combined with the historical issues of the recent financial meltdown.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Justice, Gender, and Affirmative Action Essay Example for Free

Justice, Gender, and Affirmative Action Essay Affirmative action Introduction                   Affirmative action is a policy that is aimed at providing positive measures to remedy effects of past discrimination against members of certain groups (Clayton Crosby 1992, p.2). One of the areas that suffer underrepresentation of the diverse, underrepresented individuals and minority group in colleges is the laws schools and subsequently in the legal profession. The questioned posed is â€Å"Is affirmative action the best solution to alleviating this crisis or is it the major cause together with other practices that have contributed to these underrepresentation?                   First of all is the admission procedure. Admission selection considers those with a bachelor’s degree for an accredited university or college. Few underrepresented minority students are able to attend college and obtain the relevant qualifications. Moreover, there are disparities in number of applicants and the number who get enrolled. For example in 2000, 74500 individuals submitted their application to ABA- approved school and an estimate of 67% of the total were admitted (ABA/ LSAC Pre-Conference Report, 2005, p, 4). This illustrates a flaw in the acceptance procedure that focus on higher merit in which its well document trend that underrepresented minorities score less on the Law Schools Admission Test (LSAT).                   Secondly the individual state bar exams are a severe impediment. â€Å"While the LSAT remains a reliable predictor of success in law school and the Law School Admission Council (makers of the LSAT), warn against over-reliance on numerical qualifiers alone† (ABA/ LSAC Pre-Conference Report, 2005, p, 5). Raised cut off points detriment the minorities who are disproportionately at the bottom in addition the bars are also misapplied. The percentage of residents in a state should have a proportionate percentage at the law school. The lack of a national bar does also contribute to this issue.                   The above two examples illustrate why affirmative action is needed in leveling admissions. Higher merit and higher cut off points are serving to lock out minority groups from accessing law education. In coming up with a criteria for selection, the selection board should put into consideration performance of minority groups which is at the lower end of the spectrum.                   Terry Eastland suggests that affirmative action promotes discrimination. He argues that there is nothing like positive or negative discrimination. In Higher education for example, when the institution sets a lower grade for color students, the act in itself creates discrimination. These groups of students who will be enrolled under affirmative action are well aware that they are in that position due to their race. It is a negative experience that is not easy to erase. Sometimes attitudes from the majority students will affect the students from the minority. The majority students may not look at the minority as equals.                   Affirmative action leads to stigma. Eastland says that very few people are aware of the abilities and potential of the marginalized groups. In this case they are likely to be less respected and less valued. This can end up psychologically affecting these groups and it can be worsened if they fail to perform. Terry end believes that an environment should an equal working basis. If students have to be enrolled for higher education, it should be based on merit and not race. This will create an equal working environment of mutual relationship.                   Furthermore, Eastland equates ‘Affirmative action’ to ‘lower standards’. The rationale of having a policy that sets asides positions after a normal criterion creates a barrier between quality and less quality. By having this policy, institutions are accepting that results posted from minority groups are of lesser quality and lesser magnitude to that from the majority. Policy makers argue that the minority are affected by certain factors that make them not to equal results of the majority. It then beats logic that it would be easier resolving factors that make minority perform lesser than providing a criterion that guarantee certain results.                   Terry Eastland comments and views in regard to affirmative action tend to disapprove use of affirmative action against underrepresentation based on color. His views do not factor underrepresentation due to gender. However the logic behind his reasons and those of other scholars can equally be equated to affirmative action on gender and sex segregation                   Gender affirmative actions have shown to improve the status of women in the society. In fact advocates for gender affirmative actions have sprung from various women activists and organizations. Women have gained access to representations in legislative organs, various courses in colleges that stereotypically were set for men. However it is urged that continuous paying attention to a group of people will result in then differences becoming more salient than the commonalities among people (Clayton Crosby 1992, p.11). This statement thus emphasizes Terry Eastland’s arguments against affirmative action.                   To conclude, the benefits of affirmative action are actually visible. Moving forward however, the fundamental principles of affirmative action seem to have been overtaken with time. Putting into consideration Terry Eastland arguments in regard to affirmative action, the negatives of affirmative action outweigh the positives. Affirmative action has led to lower productivity, increased segregation and stigmatization. The call to end affirmative actions thus is justified. References Clayton, Susan D, and Faye J. Crosby. Justice, Gender, and Affirmative Action. Ann Arbor, Mich: Univ. of Michigan Press, 1992. Print. Law Schools Admission Council. Pre Conference Report (2005) Collaborating to Expand the Pipeline. Retrieved from http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/migrated/op/pipelineconf/PipelinePostReport.authcheckdam.pdf Source document

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Young Goodman Brown Essay -- essays research papers

Young Goodman Brown" tells the tale of a young Puritan man drawn into a covenant with the Devil. Brown's illusions about the goodness of his society are crushed when he discovers that many of his fellow townspeople, including religious leaders and his wife, are attending a Black Mass. At the end of the story, it is not clear whether Brown's experience was nightmare or reality, but the results are nonetheless the same. Brown is unable to forgive the possibility of evil in his loved ones and as a result spends the rest of his life in desperate loneliness and gloom. Guilt vs. Innocence Hawthorne presents Young Goodman Brown's evening of diabolical revelry as the first and last fling with evil the inexperienced young man ever has. Early in the story, Brown says: "after this one nig...

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Earthquake located on the San Andreas Fault line Essay

An Earthquake that registered 7.8 on the Richter Scale which lasted approximately 1 minute caused catastrophic damage to the City of Berkeley and LPHG. As a result of the Earthquake 31 employees perished including 1 as a result of the H1Z1 virus which had an outbreak in the wake of the catastrophe. The damage and loss of life has caused significant delays to the release of LPHG’s release of EFHG. DRP Documents: (e.g., disaster  recovery plan, backup plans etc.) Include specific details about the documents, including completeness. The Disaster Preparedness plan was not written as thoroughly as possible and left little direction to the disaster recovery team. it was missing major information, such as a list of critical services, Employee contact information and vendor contact information. see more:summary of san andreas movie The Business Impact analysis for this type of scenario or any disaster was never completed so there was little information to help the disaster preparedness team as far as how this disaster will impact the organizations operations. The Backup Policy was written thoroughly and included information on the backup schedule and storage locations. It also listed the backup methods used and the length of time full backups were kept for. The document also included instructions to restore data from both differential and full backups, but did not address what to do in a disaster scenario such as this. Lastly, the document does not address data storage at an offsite location, which would be beneficial if the whole campus is lost during an emergency. Post-Disaster Response Summary: Because the DRP was not completed properly there was not enough information available to employees, and they were not able to respond properly. They had to find employees names and addresses on their own since this information was missing from the DRP. Since no Business Impact analysis was done for this type of situation there was no relevant information available to help the DR team members through this specific situation. One bright spot is that they organizations data has been protected. Strengths of Disaster Response EVALUATION Strength #1: Strength Details: Summary of Strength: The Backup plan was set up and in place and data was protected and stored in multiple locations to ensure its safety. Additionally, the data retention policy made sure that full backups were kept for a period of at least 2 weeks and that differential backups were used in addition to full backups.  Contributing Factors: Plans There was a data backup plan in place Policies Policies were clearly outlined in the Backup and Recovery Policy document, and were being followed Documents The Backup and Recovery Policy was able to provide enough documentation to explain procedures for backing up data. Positive Consequences: Because the Policy was in place and was being followed, the Organization was able to retain all of its data through this disaster. once normal operations resume that data can be restored. Ways to Improve: The locations of data storage should be revised to allow for an offsite storage location. currently both data storage locations are located on campus. At least one of these locations needs to be changed to an offsite location to allow for greater chance of data retention in case a disaster strikes that wipes out the whole campus. Strength #2: Strength Details: Summary of Strength: Data recovery plan was written and procedures were in place to restore data in case of emergency. Since this was prepared the organization can restore operations successfully and resume work when normal operations begin again Contributing Factors: Plans Data restoration plan was written and in place Policies Policies were clearly defined in Backup and recovery policy document. Documents Backup and Recovery document provides clear instructions to follow in case of emergency and outlines step by step process to restore data Positive Consequences: Since the Backup and recovery document was in place and provided clear instructions this allows for a quicker recovery time to restore data once normal operations resume. Ways to Improve: The Data recovery document should be refined to include the priority of data restoration when all business functions have been compromised Strength #3: Strength Details: Summary of Strength: Disaster Recovery team had previously prepared Disaster preparedness plan, a Backup and Recovery Policy, and a Business Impact Assessment. Contributing Factors: Plans Having these plans in place give the Disaster Recovery team the instructions they need when disaster strikes Policies There were policies in place for the Disaster Recovery team to follow these documents Documents Documents were readily available and helped provide basic guidance to Disaster recovery Team Positive Consequences: Having the documentation available helped the Disaster Recovery team kick off the process to restore the organization to operational status. Ways to Improve: These documents need to be thoroughly reviewed after the organization is restored to operational status. When they are reviewed they need to be more thoroughly filled out and include any lessons learned from the current disaster. Areas for Improvement of Disaster Response EVALUATION Area for Improvement #1: Area for Improvement Details: Summary of Area for Improvement: Documentation needs to be improved and completed. The Documentation that existed, though helpful did not provide any comprehensive guidance to the disaster recovery team. Contributing Factors: Plans The Disaster Preparedness plan and the Business Impact analysis were not completed properly. Policies Policies for developing proper disaster recovery documentation were not in place and as a result the documentation to support it was not correctly done Documents Disaster recovery documentation was not complete and did not give employees enough information to used during the disaster recovery process Consequences: There are multiple scenarios that can be created from the lack of preparedness. At the very least the lack of documentation and foresight into planning can cause a delay in the recovery process for the organization. On the more extreme side this can put the organization out of business because the organization can take an extraordinary amount of time to return to normal operating conditions Ways to Improve: Review existing documentation and ensure that is it done completely. This is an incredibly important and clearly necessary approach. Additional documentation will have to be created in order to assist the Emergency Response team in the future. Area for Improvement #2: Area for Improvement Details: Summary of Area for Improvement: Data storage and Business Continuity plan did not identify the need for an off campus site to store data backups and allow for restoration of IT services in case of emergency Contributing Factors: Plans A plan needs to be developed that involves identifying an off campus site in case of emergency Policies Policies will need to be created to identify when an alternate site is needed to be used and how to go about restoring services from that site. Documents Documentation will have to be written to support proper procedure for bringing alternate site up during emergency situations. Consequences: Without an off campus secondary site, the organization runs the risk of total destruction should an emergency happen that destroys or compromises the main campus. Ways to Improve: A secondary site with proper equipment that is far enough away from main campus could enable the organization to continue operations even if the main campus is compromised. Area for Improvement #3: Area for Improvement Details: Summary of Area for Improvement: There is no process in place to validate and review the various documents for the Disaster Recovery Plan. Additionally no Disaster response teams have been identified to review and execute these plans when needed. Contributing Factors: Plans All Disaster Recovery documentation should be completed and review periodically. A process to validate and test the plan should be put into place. Policies Policies and procedures should be created to ensure that documentation is completed and reviewed Documents All documents involving Disaster Recovery need to updated and reviewed on a regular basis. Consequences: Since the documentation was done so haphazardly, the ability to return to normal operation status in a timely manner is put in jeopardy. Even worse, this can cause the organization to cease to exist. Ways to Improve: Create a Disaster Recovery team and put them in charge of documenting and planning all facets of disaster recovery. Have them update and add the required documentation and have disaster recovery drills to verify the plans. Additionally, the team should take their findings from testing and continually update and try to improve the policy.

Monday, January 6, 2020

The Wannsee Conference Essay - 1117 Words

The Wannsee Conference Have you ever had a business meeting, a conference? Could you imagine a meeting to draw an outline to exterminate a population, 11 million Jews? The Wannsee Conference was a â€Å"meeting† to discuss how they would kill all the Jews. The Wannsee Conference put the Final Solution in motion; the World had lost their opportunity to save 6 million Jews and others. The Beginning Hitler came to power in Germany in 1933, after World War 1 when tensions were high because the Treaty of Versailles blamed Germany for the destruction the war caused and they were faced with the payment for all the damages, which sent Germany into economic downfall. The Nazi party got a lot of electoral votes that year in the government, and started†¦show more content†¦A year later in 1935 the Nuremburg laws were created, these were laws created that took away the rights of Jews. (An Introductory History of the Holocaust) this made it legal to take every right the Jews still had, away. After the hate started and kept steadily getting worse many Jews thought fleeing the country was the best option had, but there was many obstacles. The only Jews allowed to leave the country and emigrate were the ones that could afford it, and at this time not a lot of Jews had any money at all since the discrimination started. (Bergen 164) Most countries didn’t want the Jews either so Hitler knew he could do what he wanted to them or they had no one to fight for them and nowhere to go. (An Introductory History of the Holocaust) Growing bigger and bigger Once Hitler realized Jews didn’t really have anywhere to go, and that no other countries wanted them and no one was trying to stop him, he knew his plan was working, and he didn’t have anything to worry about. November 9th and 10th was the â€Å"night of the broken glass.† The attacks on Jews became very violent, they burned down their houses and synagogues, beat them, and Jews were arrested and taken to concentration camps. 30,000 Jews were imprisoned by the end of that night. (An Introductory History of the Holocaust) This was the first time Jews were actually imprisoned/ segregated from Germans. A movement Hitler didn’t stop just in Germany he wanted toShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of The Wannsee Conference Minutes As Edited By Adolf Eichmann1247 Words   |  5 PagesI. How well did they do in their translation? I believe the screenwriters did a phenomenal job in their translation of the Wannsee Conference minutes as edited by Adolf Eichmann. The film Conspiracy focuses on this infamous Wannsee Conference of January 20, 1942, where Nazi officials discussed the execution and implementation of Hitler’s â€Å"Final Solution.† Although the meeting only lasted ninety minutes, the filmmakers use that full amount of time to translate as accurately as possible what isRead MoreThe Nazi Party1100 Words   |  5 Pageswas named Wannsee. The â€Å"final solution to the jewish question† was the focus of the meeting. The term â€Å"final solution† was the phrase used by the Nazi’s for their plan for the extermination of all European Jews. This meeting was the first time that the government leaders not involved with the Nazi party were introduced to the plan for the Jews that the Nazi’s had carefully developed. The meeting was formally known as the Wannsee Confer ence and the minutes that came from that conference were top secretRead MoreGerman Nazi: The Wannsee Protocol Essay1439 Words   |  6 PagesThe Wannsee Conference is an event that took place during World War II on January 20 1942 in a small Berlin suburb called Wannsee. This conference was set up by Reinhard Heydrich, the Chief of Security Police for the Nazi’s (otherwise known as the SS) and was attended by many high ranking officials in the Nazi regime. The conference was set up in order to discuss and implement ‘The Final Solution to the Jewish Question’ in regards to the Jewish population in Europe. The minutes of this conferenceRead MoreAnalysis of Conspiracy1285 Words   |  6 Pagesfilm dramatizes the events of the Wannsee Conference of 1942, and the meeting was led by Heydrick. During the Wannsee Conference the senior officials of the Nazi regime had meeting to discuss how to remove the Jewish population from the German sphere of influence (Poland, La tvia, Estonia, Czechoslovakia and France). The director interestingly brings an aspect of Nazi psychology; Pierson highlights the casual attitudes that the senior officials had during the conference towards the ‘Jewish problem’. WithinRead MoreFilm Analysis Of The Movie Conspiracy848 Words   |  4 Pagesof the â€Å"Reich security† and appointed to lead the infamous Wannsee Conference. This conference featured many established leaders in the Nazi Party, SS, and German government and gets its name from the location of the meeting, a wealthy German suburb. The purpose of this conference was to inform the slightly lower ranking German leaders of the â€Å"Final Solution† to the ‘Jewish question.’ The movie Conspiracy focuses on the Wannsee Conference and shows the influence on many of the aforementioned leadersRead MoreAs Christ Opens The Fifth Seal Essay1667 Words   |  7 Pagesin 1942, all the Jews as â€Å"the rest of the dead† (Rev elation 20:5) is part of the Wannsee Conference. The Wannsee Conference is a more complex, meeting of fifteen high-ranking Nazi bureaucratic administrators that take place in Berlin on January 20, 1942 . They met in a villa in the Wannsee district outside Berlin to settle the details for answering Germany’s â€Å"Jewish question†. The subject during the conference is, how â€Å"to make all necessary arrangements for the preparation for an increase ofRead MoreNazi Policies Towards The Jews2078 Words   |  9 Pagesculmination of that year is represented in the Wannsee conference, which was arguably the most significant marker of a shift of policies towards the Jews, â€Å"In particular, one of its aims was to work out a viable definition of who was to be treated as a Jew.† (Gerlach, 761). This was the year where the murder â€Å"gathered pace† (Matthaus, 219), the policies shifted from anti-Jewish to murderous and these sentiments are officially declared at the Wannsee Conference in January, 1942. Already at the very beginningRead MoreThey Often Use Euphemisms To Cloak Their Intentions, Such1632 Words   |  7 Pagesthe final solution planned at the Wannsee Conference on January 20, 1942. In an article written by the USHMM titled, â€Å"Wannsee Conference and the ‘Final Solution,’† it discusses what transpired at the conference itself, stating, The Wannsee Conference, a meeting between the SS (the elite guard of the Nazi state) and German government agencies, opens in Berlin. They discuss and coordinate the implementation of the Final Solution, which is already under way. At Wannsee, the SS estimates that the FinalRead MoreHolocaust Essays1076 Words   |  5 Pagesghettoization VI. January 1942-Wannsee Conference A. Defined and outlined the â€Å"Final Solution† 1. Mass murder is employed-institutional murder. VII. These changes both reflect a pre-determined policy which was being implemented in steps, but situations- both military and social- which were presented to the Nazis forced them to reexamine or restructure policy based on need or opportunity. A. Though much legislation was pre-planned, Wannsee, for example was a responseRead More The Origins of the Holocaust Essay1547 Words   |  7 Pagesbe seen in the Minutes of the Wannsee Conference. Facing the challenges of implementing the regimes social policies that hinged on biological factors, the Wannsee Conference was called in 1942 to answer the questions concerning mixed ancestry and how to best implement policies that would reflect the regimes ideology of Blood and Soil. Establishing that their objectives were â€Å"to cleanse the German living space of Jews in a legal way,† the leadership at the conference also acknowledged that regarding